How to survive a cyber stalker

It’s an occupational hazard for women, but harassment on social media can also be a sign of a stalking problem. If it’s abuse directed to a friend or colleague, that’s an issue. Creepy pictures — particularly if they’re of very young children — may be a sign that your cyber-alien has finally overwhelmed you. (Women who have concerns about their online safety should consult their doctor and or feminist support group as quickly as possible. Here is a list of internet safety tips.)

If it’s harassment directed at a friend or colleague, that’s an issue. Creepy pictures — particularly if they’re of very young children — may be a sign that your cyber-alien has finally overwhelmed you. (Women who have concerns about their online safety should consult their doctor and or feminist support group as quickly as possible. Here is a list of internet safety tips.) If it’s harassment directed at a stranger, that’s a problem. But after carefully weighing the risk of cyber stalker manipulation, many victims will also face the reality that they might not be the only one experiencing treatment for fear that their abuser will target others.

Naturally, a great deal of angst goes into doing this work. A scary if unscientific poll from March 2013, in which Women Thrive interviewed 165 victim advocates, has some helpful tips.

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